Brush up you code design skills

Once you decided to make extensible, reusable, more stable, maintainable codes in the future, simply read these books, and start thinking about you existing projects’ code design. Both were originally written for Java language, but patterns can be pretty easily applies for everyday Objective-C development just fine.

Great books on code design

Kent Beck
Implementation Patterns

Software Expert Kent Beck Presents a Catalog of Patterns Infinitely Useful for Everyday Programming

Great book focusing on patterns showing up during design your implementations instead of writing too generic advises on the generic design patterns you’ve been probably heard of a lot.

Great code doesn’t just function: it clearly and consistently communicates your intentions, allowing other programmers to understand your code, rely on it, and modify it with confidence. But great code doesn’t just happen. It is the outcome of hundreds of small but critical decisions programmers make every single day. Now, legendary software innovator Kent Beck—known worldwide for creating Extreme Programming and pioneering software patterns and test-driven development—focuses on these critical decisions, unearthing powerful “implementation patterns” for writing programs that are simpler, clearer, better organized, and more cost effective.

Martin Flower, Kent Beck, John Brant, William Opdyke, Don Roberts
Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code

As the application of object technology - particularly the Java programming language - has become commonplace, a new problem has emerged to confront the software development community.

Gives you fantastic skills on recognize harmful code smells on your code right as you write it.

As the application of object technology – particularly the Java programming language – has become commonplace, a new problem has emerged to confront the software development community. Significant numbers of poorly designed programs have been created by less-experienced developers, resulting in applications that are inefficient and hard to maintain and extend. Increasingly, software system professionals are discovering just how difficult it is to work with these inherited, “non-optimal” applications. For several years, expert-level object programmers have employed a growing collection of techniques to improve the structural integrity and performance of such existing software programs. Referred to as “refactoring,” these practices have remained in the domain of experts because no attempt has been made to transcribe the lore into a form that all developers could use… …until now. In Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code, renowned object technology mentor Martin Fowler breaks new ground, demystifying these master practices and demonstrating how software practitioners can realize the significant benefits of this new process.

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